Where is Maria Theresa Ruthling?

Maria Theresa Ruthling disappeared in 1965 and her children still don’t have answers.

On September 23, 1965, she went to work at the Aztec Studio Shop in Scottsdale, Arizona. At 10 p.m., she called her daughter and said she was coming home.

She hasn’t been seen since.

Her car was found the next day in a shopping center parking lot, with her keys and purse inside of it. The shop where she worked had no signs of robbery or foul play.

Maria was divorced and had two daughters; she lived with the younger one. Her ex-husband was Pablo DR Ruthling (sometimes referred to as Paul), a well-known naturalist.

Maria’s family seems to be a colorful one. One of her daughters Carmen, is now a judge; the other, Anita, was married to the famous tennis announcer, the late Bud Collins.

In my research, I have found that this family has also had an incredible amount of tragedy. Seven years after Maria disappeared, Pablo Ruthling was killed when his parking brake failed and he was run over by his own car in Mexico. Maria’s grandson, Richie Dolzny, was charged with murdering his father and shooting his mother.

I also discovered an odd legal notice, which could be nothing, that says Pablo (Paul) was suing Maria over land in Santa Fe that they jointly owned. It appeared in the September 20, 1965 Santa Fe New Mexican. This could be standard in a divorce, I’m not sure, but she went missing three days after the newspaper printed the filing.

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Maybe someone with legal expertise can tell me if something like this is typical in a divorce?

I also found this mention of Pablo:

There was another older man, Pablo Ruthling, who would spend a week or so at the campground and who travelled around to Indian Resevations in the southwest and traded goods with the natives. He would ordinarily be driving an old station wagon, and carried displays of jewelry with him – he probably made some sales among climbers. He would arise at dawn and drive to String lake, where he would take an icy dip and eat a breakfast of watermelon. He had a daughter named Carmen who wanted to climb the Grand. Glenn Exum guided her and her father on the ascent, which Carmen made barefoot.

Thoughts?

1 Comment

  1. The quick thought was that the upcoming court case, related to marital discord, could have have triggered a case of “Dissociative Fugue”. This s an psychiological disorder that leads to amnesia. The person completey forgets who they are and flee. They will assume a new name possibly a new personality. They will not even recognize family members. There are a number of these cases, dating back to the late 1880, s with a guy named Ansel Bourne.

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